Welcome To Luxury Wax

Nick Herbert said, “Rolls-Royce is a modern manufacturing success story, exporting cars worldwide and creating hundreds of jobs for local people. I was fascinated to visit their factory and it was particularly good to meet many of the companys apprentices during National Apprenticeship Week. The enthusiasm of the apprentices about the trade-craft which they were learning was clear.  It is great that Rolls-Royce has given such an important opportunity to local young people.” He continued, It was also fantastic to see the new Rolls-Royce Wraith before this sensational new model appears on the streets.

 

Torsten Müller-Ötvös, CEO of Rolls-Royce Motor Cars said, “We were delighted to welcome Nick Herbert to the Home of Rolls-Royce. We are very proud of our successful apprenticeship programme and are fully committed to the development and training of young people in the UK manufacturing industry.”

 

The company’s Apprenticeship Programme was successfully launched in 2006 and provides people aged 16-24 with the opportunity to train with the Goodwood-based manufacturer of the world’s best-selling ultra-luxury cars. The apprenticeships last for up to four years and combine on-the-job training with studying for nationally recognised qualifications. The programme has been designed in conjunction with the Learning Skills Council (LSC) and several local colleges.

 

In addition to the Apprenticeship Programme, more than 60 young men and women were employed with the company in 2012 on industrial placements ranging in duration from six to 12 months; further positions are likely to be available this year. The company also runs a successful graduate programme, with new positions made available each year.

Motor Codes, the OFT-approved garage scheme operator, has today announced the shortlist of businesses in the running for its Garage of the Year title.  Thousands have voted in the annual initiative that helps uncertain motorists know where to turn for top-class customer service.  Over 7,000 garages from across the UK, all subscribers to Motor Codes’ government-backed code of practice, put themselves up for public scrutiny.